G-Star Jeans

Earmarked as the ‘thing to have’ among many fashion conscious individuals, G-Star Jeans proclaim to offer supreme quality and unique style within every garment. Word of mouth is everything in the fashion industry and no amount of marketing can maintain demand if customer brand perception is lost. This represents a delicate challenge for global fashion brands as they grow.

Rather than follow regular means of advertising such as television, the brand look to preserve market perception through carefully planned associations. These have included endorsements from actress Gemma Arterton and chess player Magnus Carlsen. Question marks do remain however on brand saturation with product available in a large store portfolio including UK fashion chain Republic.

Various styles and finishes are used within the Danish brand’s products, giving the label the ability to respond to changes within High Street fashion. Stores are offered a large selection of jeans to choose from and the company offer stock replenishment to create maximum profit from winning lines.

Competing in the tough fashion industry of today, many other brands are producing similar styles featuring fitted denim. This brings in the element of competitive pricing and quality of garments. With vast experience of changes in trends it seems G-Star are able to focus on quality of design to drive sales. A key ingredient here is the ability to retain customers trust that they are purchasing the latest look.

Further profile is achieved through detailed branding and unique promotional campaigns to keep G-Star moving in the right direction as the organisation continues to grow. With the inclusion of branded buttons and zips, the widely available denim is more likely to justify the hefty price tag in the eyes of the customer.

The G-Star brand has demonstrated good adaptation to changes within fashion on the High Street by releasing their own range of trousers to combat the chino revolution responsible for challenging the domination of denim. Although this move away from jeans is unlikely to last, it does demonstrate the necessary flexibility of the company to follow fashion trends.

When compared to rival brands such as Diesel and Replay, G-Star have chosen a more varied store portfolio, happy to be seen in stores with a lower profile and wider audience. An example of this is the recent move to deal with young fashion chain Bank, who has over sixty stores in the UK. Will such moves result in growth or a loss of image and a decline in turnover? Only time will answer this question and will no doubt prove pivotal to the future of the brand.